Portraits in Pride

It was with no little irony that, only days after I wrote on Barclays’ use of Pride to pinkwash its image, the bank was accused once again of corruption and fraud. Strangely, Barclays’ Twitter account failed to mention this. They’re probably too busy loving gays:

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They’re pink. Do you see what they did there?

This brilliant piece by @spitzenprodukte succinctly captured how (and why) Pride lost its way. Cleverly inverting the usual claim that the event is no longer political, he wrote that:

…’Pride in London’ will continue to support the values of the police and the establishment; the supremacy of property rights, marriage, the oppression and othering of people of colour, and racist attitudes towards foreign cultures. It is wrong to say Pride is now a depoliticised event: it is more politicised than ever. It has been turned over to the service of the dominant ideology, and so is harder to distinguish from the cruelties and injustices of everyday life. We have lost Pride. 

There is perhaps no greater illustration of Pride serving ‘the dominant ideology’ than the presence of arms dealer BAE Systems on the parade (covered by at least one other blogger this week). The Campaign Against the Arms Trade has good material on BAE where you can learn, for example, how it helped the despots in Bahrain crack down on pro-democracy protestors. This ‘crack down’ (a euphemism if ever there was one) led to over 90 deaths and the widespread use of torture. You can also read about BAE’s close ties to the regime in Saudi Arabia – by all accounts one of the most authoritarian and brutal governments in the world. It should be no surprise that LGBT rights in Saudi Arabia are dire, given that human and LGBT rights should be synonymous. As Pride reveals, however, mainstream LGBT politics is lacking any incisive notion of human rights and is easily swayed towards targets which serve the dominant ideology – as evidenced by the sound and fury over Russia compared to the relative silence on Western ‘allies’ such as Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Egypt (the latter two also being countries where BAE’s bloody prints are to be found).

The response from Pride regarding this (take from Symon Hill’s blog linked above) is extraordinary:

Organisations apply and BAE have an LGBT group. Change can come from within. We will not abandon and disengage with LGBT groups who strive for the right and the freedom to express themselves

‘Change can from from within’? What does that even mean?! These people work for an arms dealer. I’m going to go out on a limb here and say that Pride wasn’t basing that response on any concrete evidence that BAE’s LGBT group have an agenda to make their arms dealer a bit nicer(!) but were rather grasping at straws. They become even more offensive when they speak of not being willing to ‘abandon and disengage’, as if the employees of BAE Systems are oppressed rather than being part of an oppressor. We will not ‘abandon and disengage’ with this arms dealer as they continue to profit from death, torture and destruction – some of them are LGBT! It beggars belief.

Of course, one central staple of the modern LGBT movement in countries like the UK is that most of the real problems are over there. It my be selective in the countries it fixates on, but the finger tends to be pointed firmly away from ourselves. As such there is no real pressure to consider the role of a company like BAE Systems in violating basic human rights. There is certainly no pressure to consider our own foreign policy and the role of our armed forces, who are also marching on the parade. In fact, the Pride site proudly trumpets:

28th June is also Armed Forces Day, and once again we are delighted and honoured to have members of the Army, Navy and Royal Air Force marching in the Parade. 

This can easily be seen as part of the continuing militarisation of our civic life where an oppressively infantile attitude towards ‘OUR BRAVE BOYS’ becomes ever more unavoidable – witness Labour’s absolutely abhorrent plans to make ‘abuse’ of the armed forces a ‘hate crime’. This serves to shut down critical discussion of our foreign policy and the role of the military in it, as well as examinations of the military itself (e.g. the systemic reports of sexual harassment, assault and rape). Vron Ware’s entire Up In Arms series looking at these issues is essential reading.

Looking at the pressures to blankly cheer aggressve authority leads neatly to the presence of the MET Police on the Pride march. For a certain kind of Pride attendee, the MET will undoubtedly be the friendly face of ‘law and order’ in London – the nice people who come and help when you’ve been burgled, the attractive officer they send to ‘liaise’ with the LGBT community in Soho bars. Yet, somewhat ironically, if Pride were to have more explicitly political (and anti-establishment) aims you can be certain that the MET would not be marching but rather aggressively policing it as part of their efforts to intimidate and delegitimise protest. These efforts, lest we forget, have seen the police brutalise students and even kill innocent (not that it should matter) bystanders.

An awareness that policing is not some apolitical, neutral institution should be central to Pride which, after all, marks the anniversary of the riots against police which are iconically known as ‘Stonewall’. The radicalism of that event, and the fundamentally key role played in it by people of colour, trans people and sex workers, has been erased over time (look no further than the timid conservatism of the charity named after it). It’s highly relevant that the MET Police remains institutionally racist to the core – the view not of some cranky blogger but of itsown people. It is only a few months since the inquest verdict on the murder of Mark Duggan revealed the racist faultlines of the UK and shone some light on our racist policing. There is also transphobiacontinuing persecution of sex workers and widespread misogyny. The police’s role as an aggressive enforcer and defender of the state is clear, from its spying through its attacks on squatting to its complete lack of accountability for its brutality. In short, unless you’re a comfortable white cis male with no urge to protest or rock the boat in any way, you have no reason to cheer a police force which is unaccountable and out of control.

These are three of the most egregious examples of Pride’s service to the ‘dominant ideology’ but other Pride participants are like a who’s who in fraud, tax avoidance and other unethical behaviour: CitibankPWCMicrosoftDeloitte,VodafoneBPRBSKPMG. The conduct of each could be examined on its own but, as Losing Pride argues, their presence at Pride is testament to its transformation from a radical liberation movement which explicitly linked LGBT rights to wider social justice into one where visibility within injustice is an end in itself. And so:

Once you have reached the bar of being out and proud, any further structural or material concerns are a private matter, and unrelated to your sexual identity or politics.

And you can be certain that this will be the response of many to these concerns: what BAE Systems and co actually do is irrelevant, what matters is that LGBT people can be represented within them. Aside from being anathema to the foundations of Pride, this attitude is both fed by and feeds into the atomisation, individualisation and depoliticising which characterises modern capitalism. Legal ‘equality’ within a racist, sexist, homophobic, transphobic, imperialist system which relies on the immiseration of the majority of humanity is no equality worth marching for. Rather than providing pinkwashing in return for some money, Pride should be a safe space of radical awakening. The links between LGBT liberation and wider social justice should be writ large and we should actively oppose the continued (and hypocritical) use of LGBT bodies and identity by companies which demonstrate time after time after time that their profit comes before human dignity.

#FreedomTo Say No To Barclays at #PrideinLondon

If it wasn’t already basic Marketing 101, I could swear that Barclays had a strategy document hidden away somewhere with a title like ‘Pinkwashing: It’s Piss Easy’. I’ve written a few times previously about their involvement with Stonewall, who seem happy to get into bed with any company which bats an eyelash at them even if its commitment is somewhat half-hearted. This week saw Barclays’ use of the LGBT community to bolster its image reach new depths with the launch of an advertising campaign built around its sponsorship of London Pride. Its Spectrum group, dedicated to ‘diversity and inclusion’, has been encouraging the use of #FreedomTo on social media and merrily tweeting images like these:

I find it interesting that any explicit reference to or portrayal of LGBT people on these adverts is muted – in fact, it would be easy enough to entirely miss that this was an LGBT-focused campaign rather than some generic, asinine message. This is particularly noticeable in their risible ‘GAYTMs’:

What are these?! I fail to see how sub-Hallmark sentiments written on some terrible patterns which have escaped from adorning bus seats suggest ‘LGBT Pride’ in any way whatsoever. And yet they’ve inspired adoring responses:

It doesn’t stop there. If looking at insipid messages, terrible graphic design and portrayals of LGBT life which wouldn’t scare the most virulent homophobe don’t make you proud enough you can actually adorn yourself in some marketing:

As space hijackers tweeted, what was once a riot is now a “contactless adventure”! Branding yourself in this way even seems to get you access to a ‘private’ area of Pride in Golden Square, something listed on both the Pride and‘bpay’ sites but with no further information provided. Possibly because an area reserved for people who prostrate themselves before a corporate sponsor isn’t exactly in keeping with the radical origins of Pride.

Not that Barclays, or Pride, would know it. The exchange beneath this tweet is illuminating. When someone complains that this branding is ‘not in the spirit of Pride’, Barclays responds that the event couldn’t even happen ‘without the financial support of Corporates”. The Pride account then chips in, saying that “only corporate sponsorship” allows the event to have “a unique meaning for everyone who comes along”. To complete the unholy triumvirate, an employee of Stonewall pops up to insist that “corporate support is vital to pride” and enquire as to how else it would be funded. The message is clear – the ungrateful oink who deigned to question the corporate branding of Pride should shut up. Barclays are doing the queers a favour! The fact that Pride events happened without such sponsorship for many years, and continue to happen today, is presumably irrelevant. The notion that Pride could have an ethical sponsorship policy is ludicrous because…reasons. Even more absurd is the idea that Pride probably doesn’t really need a series of stages (costing in excess of £200,000) featuring a bunch of terrible acts no-one has heard of. Lest we forget, Pride is held around the anniversary of the Stonewall riots (bang on the day this year, in fact). It rather sticks in the craw that this event, commonly held to be the beginning of the modern radical LGBT liberation movement, is now an excuse for a company as mired in scandal, sleaze and immorality as Barclays to apply an easy gloss to its image. Any doubt that this is the main purpose behind their sponsorship should be put to rest by this odious interview in the Evening Standard, which glosses over “slashing jobs or preserving sky-high pay” to provide a Pride-based platform for the Barclays CEO to trumpet the company’s “ethical dimension” and its ‘diversity’. That’s quite handy just weeks after you’ve announced the sacking of almost 20,000 people. It’s handy when your bank has been the single largest supporter of the arms trade in the UK sector, profiting from the support and sale of arms to not-exactly-LGBT-friendly regimes such as Saudi Arabia and Uganda and supporting the manufacture of drones. It helps in avoiding unfortunate questions about your bank’s seemingly endless scandals, from Libor to money-laundering/sanction-busting to unwarranted bonuses to helping cause and profiting from the hunger and malnutrition of millions. Barclays is no friend of the LGBT community. It’s no friend of most of humanity. We owe it no gratitude and we certainly owe no loyalty to Pride in assisting with its pinkwashing. Instead, let’s in a small but meaningful way show them that we value the roots of Pride. We value liberation for everyone and will not allow our dignity to be commodified in the name of an abhorrent bank. The #freedomto say ‘not in our name’ is where real pride lies.